Prosperity? Preposterous!

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“World War II was a time of great prosperity in the U.S.”

Whoever came up with that statement probably meant very well by saying it but at the same time that person was very uninformed because the statement above is quite false. Sure it was a time of prosperity for the weaponry businesses and military factories but for the public it was not.

40% of the U.S.’s labor force was employed in the armed forces or war production areas. Do normal everyday people (aka: consumers) buy bombs, tanks, or other military goods? Does the public benefit from their fellow townspeople going off to war? From my perspective the answer to those questions is: NO. The 40% of the labor force is not working to supply the public with consumer goods; the 40% is either at war or working to provide war goods. Therefore the remnant of the eligible labor force (the people not involved with war stuff) is working even harder to produce enough consumer goods to sustain the population.

Another fact that my teacher failed to mention in the lesson where he covered this topic is that the U.S. had a drop in population because of WWII. I’m talking thousands of fatalities- deaths. That is not prosperous. It is the opposite of prosperous. I mean seriously many people died! Not to mention that the people who died were probably some of the best workers that the U.S. had and when they died the U.S. had fewer productive people on its labor force. Sure unemployment rates fell. But they fell because people were off in war dying. Don’t get me wrong, I’m not an anti-war guru, but really WWII was NOT a time of prosperity- I’m guessing that it probably wasn’t in many places.

To make things extra clear I am going to end this essay with something for you to ponder- the definition of prosperity.

Prosperity:

the condition of being successful or thriving; economic well-being.

Photo Credit: Me.  Meet Langosta.  Langosta is this guy’s Spanish name, it is translated to “lobster.”  I have no idea why it is called that…   This is a six inch caterpilar/ worm bug likes to infest one of our trees on our property.  These little creatures are quite an amazing creation.  They look fake, but trust me they are real!  Our Creator sure has a detailed imagination!

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17 thoughts on “Prosperity? Preposterous!

    1. I’m not exactly sure. Here in Ecuador they call it “Langosta” which means lobster… I guess you could google Spanish langosta bug and see if anything comes up.

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      1. Beautiful! I miss those kind of climates…
        I was wondering what your favorite classes have been so far. If you are able and have the time, your feedback would be really helpful in planning for next year!

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      2. I haven’t taken too many classes but these are the ones that I enjoyed the most: Western Civilization 1, Government 1 A&B, English 1 (autobiographies), and Business 1. I will soon be starting Western Lit 2 and Western Civ 2 and I’m sure that I will enjoy them too!

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    1. I agree with your assessment entirely. I have done a lot of reading about different aspects of WWII, and you are correct. Certain individuals and corporations DO prosper in times of war, but not the average working person. Interestingly, I read that one not-so-well-known industry that thrived during WWII was the cosmetic industry. I have read that it was one thing most women would not do without, even though deprived of necessities, just so they felt a little more in control of their lives. Oh, and they didn’t have a ration card for makeup, as far as I know. Interesting, huh?

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      1. Oh wow! I would never have guessed that the cosmetic industry thrived during WWII. But I can understand it completely. I suppose that since there weren’t as many men around the the women wanted to look their best for the remaining men 😉 . Thank you for sharing that interesting fact!
        -A

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